One in two UK kids refuses to eat veg

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ALMOST HALF (46 per cent) of British children REFUSE to eat vegetables, according to a new study of parents.

Researchers surveyed UK parents about the eating habits of their children – and revealed a staggering 75 per cent have worries or concerns about their fussy eating.

A further 52 per cent claimed their child’s refusal to eat healthy foods is a major issue, according to the study.

According to the report, 66 per cent of parents say trying to get their children to eat healthily is a stressful experience.

Overall, 82 per cent of the parents who took part in the study claimed there are some foods that their child simply will not eat – including veg, salad, meat, fish and dairy – however according to data, vegetables are the main cause for concern, with 46 per cent of children refusing to eat them.

Greens such as cabbage (43 per cent of children will not eat it), spinach (39 per cent) and broccoli (39 per cent) were among the main vegetables the nation’s parents struggle to feed their children.

Mushrooms (39 per cent) and beetroot (35 per cent) were also revealed as foods kids are highly likely to refuse, while 13 per cent said their child would not eat any red meat – and a further one in ten said their children will not eat an apple.

A desperate 38 per cent said the stress of mealtimes with their children has led to rows with their other half – with 59 per cent saying they often feel at the wits end with the problem.

The research revealed one of the major reasons children are picky with food is because they don’t know where it comes from, with 64 per cent of parents saying their children have never grown any kind of vegetable at home – compared to just 36 per cent who say they have.

And of the 36 per cent who said they had tried to grow their own food, 32 per cent said it made their children more willing to try new foods.

More than half of those who took part in the study (53 per cent) say they are embarrassed when at other people’s houses because their children refuse to eat anything, while 64 per cent admitted they have caved in and given their children something high in sugar, salt or fat – simply to avoid a scene.

The study also revealed 48 per cent of parents say they feel pressure from other parents posting pics of their children eating adventurous foods on social media.

A further 60 per cent say they find family mealtimes stressful and a further 47 per cent say they avoid going to restaurants with their children because they know they won’t be able to find anything on the menu their kids will eat.

FOODS BRITISH CHILDREN WILL NOT EAT

Cabbage 43.2%
Spinach 39.5%
Broccoli 39.5%
Mushrooms 38.9%
Beetroot 35.0%
Kale 35.0%
Leeks 34.0%
Lettuce 31.6%
Tomatoes 31.2%
Onions 30.9%
Peppers 30.9%
Lentils 29.7%
Peas 25.3%
Carrots 23.4%
Cucumber 23.2%
Fish 19.8%
Beans 19.0%
Sweetcorn 17.0%
Eggs 16.6%
Oranges 14.1%
Red meat (lamb / beef) 13%
Potatoes 12.0%
Bananas 12.9%
Gravy 10.2%
Apples 10.4%
White meat (chicken / pork) 9.8%

Research was conducted online in March 2017 – sample size 2,000 parents

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