Spanish police arrested 32 alleged drug traffickers

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THE GUARDIA CIVIL has arrested 32 alleged drug traffickers and seized a ton of hash across the provinces of Malaga and Cadiz.

The gang was responsible for stealing from rival drug rings and reselling the loot throughout Spain.

They used firearms to intimidate contenders at their storage facilities, or while the narcotics were in transit.

When the drugs were transported by truck, members of the crime network placed cars in front and behind the vehicles.

According to the Guardia Civil, they waited for the truck to slow near a toll bridge then robbed the vehicle at gunpoint, and in some cases even beat the driver.

After the heist, members would distribute the drugs across rented houses while they waited for their transfer trucks.

All detainees allegedly had a specific role within the organisation, working together to devise plans to seize drug stocks whilst avoiding the detection of government services.

During the investigation, National Police worked alongside the Guardia Civil to seize 1,227 kilograms of hashish, €20,000 in cash and a further 500 counterfeit banknotes.

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