Christmas recycling tips

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Christmas recycling tips

ALONG with the fun and festivities of Christmas comes a huge increase in household waste. Enjoy this special time with a clear conscience by following RTN’s handy tips.

  1. Recycle used cardboard and wrapping paper

Toy packaging, Christmas wrapping paper, selection boxes, even Christmas crackers; remember to recycle all waste cardboard and paper this year. Flatten them down as much as possible and remove any plastic inserts, which may not be recyclable. Try to keep the paper and cardboard dry. If you don’t have a recycling bin or if it’s overflowing, you can use your localecoparque.

  1. Get creative and reuse

Save your Christmas cards each year so you can cut the fronts into gift tags. This is a clever way of saving money, reducing waste and it gives you a unique and creative accent to your wrapping. Used wrapping paper, gift tags and cards can all also be upcycled into Christmas decorations like hanging tree ornaments or garlands. Being environmentally friendly can also mean being thrifty and having some fun.

  1. Power through waste batteries

All that playing over Christmas with battery powered toys may mean you are left with a mound of old batteries, which should be recycled.

  1. Compost waste food

It’s the most excessive time of year, when we eat and drink the most and we’re bound to leave some after us too. Dispose of any suitable leftovers in a compost bin to create a free and nutritious compost to help make your garden bloom come spring time.

  1. Recycle old electrical items

You may receive a great Christmas present that replaces an old electrical appliance or gadget. Recycle old or broken electrical items at your local ecoparque.

  1. Take unwanted gifts to a charity shop

Unfortunately, sometimes those we love don’t buy us presents we love! One man’s trash is another’s treasure though, so give those unwanted gifts to a charity shop and hopefully they will do some good for someone in need.

  1. Recycle glass

Over the holidays, our consumption of food and drink rises, so it’s a good idea to think responsibly about all those extra jars and bottles left in the aftermath. Rinse out glass bottles or jars to get rid of any leftovers, then take the glass to your nearest bottle bank, putting each item into the correct bank for its colour. Metal lids should be removed and recycled separately with drink cans.

  1. Recycle plastic

Check the bottom of plastic containers for a recycling symbol, usually a triangle with the number 1 or 2 inside, to see if you can recycle it. Rinse out any leftovers and then squash them to save space before recycling.

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